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Insect (names) in Fireworks [study]

May 25th, 2020

 

Dr. Joe Coelho, who is Professor of Biology at Quincy University, Illinois, US, is the author of ‘Insects In Fireworks’ a paper published in Ethnoentomology: an Open Journal of Ethnoentomology and Cultural Entomology, 2: 20–29.

To clarify, the paper is not about the use of insects as ingredients in firework mixtures, but rather the use of their names in firework branding.

“Fireworks with entomological names were observed in order to examine how arthropods were represented. Hymenoptera were the most commonly occurring group, followed by Lepidoptera and Arachnida. Fountains were the most common type of entomological firework, followed by aerial spinners. The most frequent noise associated with insect fireworks was the crackle, followed by the hummer.”

The paper can be read in full here :

The professor maintains a YouTube channel showing a collection of videos of entomological fireworks for a study in cultural entomology.

Note: The paper (and the videos) also feature some spiders which, it may be remembered, are not insects, but non-insect arthropods.

Research research by Martin Gardiner

Pocket-Sized #1010: “Hot Potato Voice”

May 23rd, 2020

Hot Potato Voice

In this Pocket-Sized episode #1010, Marc Abrahams shows some unfamiliar research studies to Dany Adams. Dramatic readings and reactions ensue.

Remember, our Patreon donors, on most levels, get access to each podcast episode before it is made public.

1. Dany Adams encounters:

‘Hot Potato Voice’ in Peritonsillitis: A Misnomer,” Mahmood F. Bhutta, George A. Worley and Meredydd L. Harries, Journal of Voice, vol. 20, no. 4, December 2006, pp. 616-622. 

Seth GliksmanProduction Assistant

Available on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Overcast, Google Podcasts, AntennaPod, BeyondPod and elsewhere!

How to write a hard-to-resist science headline: Quantum, Coffee

May 22nd, 2020

Trinity College Dublin produced a press release, on January 31, 2020, with this headline: Supercomputers help link quantum entanglement to cold coffee“.

The press release is meant to draw attention to a research paper by Marlon Brenes, Silvia Pappalardi [pictured here], John Goold, and Alessandro Silva.

The paper is titled “Multipartite Entanglement Structure in the Eigenstate Thermalization Hypothesis,” and published in the journal Physical Review Letters (2020; 124, 4).

The paper itself does not mention coffee.

UPDATE (May 22): Investigator Mason Porter writes: We’ve got the coffee (well, at least the caffeine) covered: “Spatial Applications of Topological Data Analysis: Cities, Snowflakes, Random Structures, and Spiders Spinning Under the Influence

Pocket-Sized #1009: “Barefoot Running”

May 20th, 2020

Barefoot Running

In this Pocket-Sized episode #1009, Marc Abrahams shows some unfamiliar research studies to Jean Berko Gleason. Dramatic readings and reactions ensue.

The research mentioned in this episode is featured in the special Psychology issue (vol. 26, #1) of the Annals of Improbable Research magazine.

Remember, our Patreon donors, on most levels, get access to each podcast episode before it is made public.

1. Jean Berko Gleason encounters:

An Exploratory Study Investigating the Effects of Barefoot Running on Working Memory,” Ross G. Alloway, Tracy Packiam Alloway, Peter M. Magyari, and Shelley Floyd, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 122, no. 2, 2016, pp. 432-443.

Seth GliksmanProduction Assistant

Available on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Overcast, Google Podcasts, AntennaPod, BeyondPod and elsewhere!

A rather different Ig Nobel Prize ceremony this (the 30th!) year

May 20th, 2020

The 30th First Annual Ig Nobel Prize ceremony will happen a little differently than its 29 predecessors, because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Here’s the general plan.

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!